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and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
. very clearly. we will wipe out israel. when the united states of america then we go after this sunday people, the christians to send you a message. you have to wake up many people think not in my backyard. if it is it is really is a year backyard. what is the connection between hezbollah and iran and venezuela? why do they work together and they fly a the slides from here to caracas? hatred of the shared values the american values of what you represent. this comes from our brand and will come to the shores of the united states. we will all remember the attack of 9/11. and to attack the towers of new york city, i can share with all due respect to our intelligence if al qaeda wanted to attack the towers but they chose to attack in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do i
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] >> find in the speech from both the democratic and republican conventions on line at the c-span video library. book tv coverage from the 2012 rose above reading festival continues. mary stuck the talks about her book, the finding americans, the presidency in national identity. >> now i have to try to be engaging. i think the most important thing to understand about the presidency in this context is that we always have choices. when you pick a president you are absolutely picking a particular kind of policy, but you're also picking a definition of our national identity -- identity. if you hear president and you like what they're saying to make you feel yourself call to the presidency than they are speaking to you about a sense of the national self that is deeply imbedded in all of us, and every time there's a presidential alexian will one of our previous presidents learned to his sorrow has the vision thing is really an important part of what the presidency does because we see ourselves as a nation through the ways that presidents
in egypt, say is turkey the model, i say there is no good model. even the united states of america is not a model if you are serious about freedom, dignity and also the power of the state. because i'm ready to talk about -- i will come to that point about separating, you know, the state from religion. but if you separate or distinguish the state from religion, tell me what you put instead of religion. because what we are facing in the west now -- and we all know this as citizens -- i live in europe, you live in the united states of america, and we all know that the problem that we have with our democracies now is not the dramatic decision of religions, but some magic decisions of transnational corporation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to think anything. and we call it democracy, we're still today dealing with powers that are beyond the democratic procedures. the banks, transnational corporations. and we are facing with people who are deciding. for example, in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats who are coming to solve the problem. we never el
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
. because one thing that is unique of the united states, you go round, the free market system is really supported by a vast majority of the american people. this is not true in europe. it's not true in asia. it's not true and latin america. and my understanding of this, it is because they have experienced a superior form of capitalism. what drives this for a free market systems? because there's a tension between free markets and democracy. democracy was somehow intent for mortgage vision and free markets, equal outcome because it's necessary to provide proper incentives. so why people should support, and the answer is because number one, the system is so productive, so efficient that they make everybody better off, the engine of growth, brian was talking about. number two is because all this growth gets sort of than a decent enough share so that even the poor are reached, and the third one is because they think that this system is fair. and, of course, it's a bit of a vicious circle that what you think is fair depends on your view, edit your be the sort of the market competition is fair
through small local banks or sometimes large local banks. what happens is people in the united states and europe who fund these things generally go through an intermediary so they give their money to institutions such as kiva, a famous one that you -- deutsche bank, citibank, the traditional wall street companies, dedicated microfinance funses such as blue orchard, the biggest one in the order, and then you have the foundations. so in d.c. we have two examples, such as the foundation u.s.a. and calvert foundation but there are whole hot of these institutions. you give your money to one of these intermediary asks they apparently invest this in the -- in your best interests and in the best interests of the poor by channeling this money to these small banks in developing countries that are going to do effective microfinance. that's the idea. that's the theory. >> well, this book has been promoted and my understanding is that members of the church congregations, people making responsible investments are flocking to this opportunity. tell us about some of the people providing the money. >>
reach its foreign policy goals while under the wing of the united states which he says count always have israel's -- doesn't always have israel's best interests at heart. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> shalom, good evening, everybody. it is my pleasure to be here with you, especially when you have such great weather in washington. almost like jerusalem at this time of the year. i am very happy to see so many people coming and showing an interest in my book, and i would like in the next 20 minutes to share with you not what you're going to read in the book, but what's behind the ideas. but first i want to think we all can agree that's what's happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. and because we are in the middle east today being attacked, so you have to ask yourself why those people are against the jewish nation in the middle east. the arab against israel not because of the land that we so-called occupied. we are being attacked be
howard taft was both supreme court chief justice and before that a president of the united states, came from cincinnati. cincinnati in some ways was a southern town because it was oriented, its trade was with the south along the ohio river and the mississippi. it also was the home of the underground railroad. so if you could get slaves -- the slaves could get out of kentucky and cross the ohio river, in some ways they were safe in ohio. and then they could be dispersed to other places where they were even safer in ohio. so taft was from here. harding was from marion, ohio, just north of columbus here. william mckinley who was elected president in 1896 was an ohioan. so a whole bunch of ohioans. james garfield, again, was an ohioan. he was a short-lived president because he was assassinated in office. but you have a set of presidents who came during this period, many many after the civil war all the way up into the 1920s. and then it sort of stops. they were pulling presidents from other parts of the country afterwards. they tend to be more moderate, for one thing. they don't tend to be
in the united states. we at the bush center -- are here with the their spouses we're fortunate to be associated with smu. our relationship with smu competed our expectations. i hope we have exceeded your expectations. we're very much involved in action oriented programs. i didn't want to be known as a think tanker. i want to be known as an a,-oriented place that can make a difference in the world. and so i want to thank you very much for having faith in us when we first convince you to support the bush center on the smu campus. we just got back from africa which is. we went over there because at the bush center, one of the major initiatives is to honor human life. we believe all life is precious. whether they live in america on the continent of africa. we are disturbed by the fact that many women who have got the hiv virus, are getting cervical cancer not much is being done with it with your help we put together a collaborative effort to save lives. part of the mission was to kick off the red ribbon in bots wanna as well as to follow up in zambia where we kick it off in december. we wanted to g
'm not trying to say new york is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we're all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time, new york is the great magnet for immigrants, from around the world from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward has been a place where discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political culture, their own loyalties and allegiances come in their ethnic and national religious cultures and have ended up jostling each other often. and especially at times of war, this has been the case in new york. sometimes with tragic consequences. so i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting today. so this is april of 1861, after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in this world war began. this is one of the mass rall
in the united states of america, and we know the problem with the democracies now is not the dogmatic decisions of religions, but some decisions of frans national cooperation and economy power deciding without being able to say anything and we cull it democracy, still today dealing with power that are beyond the procedure. the banks, transnational cooperation, and, for example, in greece, in spain, in italy, we have those coming to solve the problem we never elected them, but money is choosing them. we have to deal with not simplistic answer when it comes to separate religion from states, what do you have? directing the state or imposing decision on to the state which is also imposing decision on to us as citizens. this western model, i think, be washington. we all have to deal with problems and crisis from within. i wouldn't push the arab world to follow blindly the western model, but take the better, the best from the others and try their own way. having said that, the first problem is the nature of the state. why -- i was referring to this dpsh voided referring to islamic states, and if you
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
in a factory, and vanzetti had an odd job after immigrating to the united states and he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants, but in the united states, they became radicalized of the anarchist leader who advocated violence. but it was ordinary, and i think the fact that they were just too ordinary guys caught in a nightmare that it's part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think they are there for the grace of god. >> finally, susan tejada come something about your book was april 15th, 1920 you put it in context. it was also the opening day of the boston red sox baseball season, first year without babe ruth. why do you do that, why you put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring their readers and to the story to make it seem real so that the readers might feel they are in the courtroom, they are in the prison and in the death chamber. it's important to make history come alive. >> susan tejada this is your first book right? >> first adult book. >> you've written children's books? what is the name of one? >> i've written childre
is about the only independent graduate research institution in the united states of america. that is a part of the historical black colleges and university community. what we're here to talk about today there is a major crisis in america, one more damaging than even the nation's daunting economic landscape. the american education system has failed young people of color. african-american males in particular. the evidence is somewhat overwhelming. only 55% of all black students graduate from high school on time with a regular diploma. on average, african-american twelfth grade students read at approximately the same grade level as white eighth graders and the twelfth grade were lower than significantly lower than any other racial and ethnic group. in march 2007 editorial, phillip jackson from chicago's black star project. there was no longer a need for dire predictses, apprehension about losings a generation of black boys. it is too late. a generation in education, employment, economics, incarceration, health, and parents we have lost a generation of young black males. they have the worst gra
, which says, the judicial power of the united states shall be vested in one supreme court and such inferior courts the congress may from time to time ordain and establish. and that is as article iii goes on and talks a bit about the jurisdiction of the court and so on, but many, many unanswered questions, including for instance no mention of the chief justice in article iii. we only inferred that are supposed to be a chief justice because he is given in article article ii, the presidential article, the right to preside over -- not the right, the duty to preside over the impeachment trial in the senate of the president of the united states. and remember, william rehnquist did that in the bill clinton impeachment trial and when he was later asked what it had amounted to, he said i did nothing in particular and i did it very well. so the duties of the chief justice are undefined. and much about the supreme court initially with undefined. so it really had to create itself and it's done so not in a straight line progression, but it's done so true askew says some of the cases th
announcing in the quietest most resurgent way possible that i'm grateful to live in the united states of america. that's all. gratitude for the sacrifices of my forebears. gratitude for the opportunity this country a force. gratitude for the men and women who served to fight in the military probably. gratitude for being a part of this amazing, ennobling experience representative democracy. blood, liberals hate the americans event is just okay. not good, not great. serving unexceptional. just okay. conservative women, mouthy ladies. to see some truly a lover i want, in your next conversation with a liberal, i was thinking about something sarah palin said the other day. stanback. led to the huffing and puffing and sighing and moaning begin to get as much as you finish the set by the way. you could say sarah palin likes chocolate ice cream or sarah palin thanks panda bears are cuddly. the result is going to be a kind of deranged automatic rejection of anything sarah palin says or thinks. try with ann coulter. same reaction. actually try with any well-known female who is unapologetically
is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we are all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time new york is a great magnet for immigrants from around the world, from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward, has been a place for discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political cultures, the room loyalties and allegiances their ethnic and natural visages cultures and have ended up jostling each other. and especially at times of war come of this has the case in the year, sometimes the tragic consequences. i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting tonight. so this is april of 1861 after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in the civil war began.
admitted he ordered a first strike against the united states. and at the time, the moscow, the gist of the conversation moscow had with him was if we happens do you know what is going to your island? it is going to disappear and with you. castro wanted them go ahead. it is also reported that about twenty years later, castro knew the request and didn't we have the conversation before? you look at the situation in the mideast today. you have iran, and if iran goes nuclear, your going to have already the saudis said they would publicly said they. prepared. who picked the phone up [inaudible] to pakistan and biofuel. how many dollars do you want for how many barrels and never mind the bit about the tweptd-year program. you take the barrels and put them underneath the aircraft, the 159 and 16 tion and you don't have to have fancy safety devices and things. they wopt have time to figure that out. now you have close proximity hundred of miles away in some cases, supersonic jets in bases that may be viely vulnerable app small number of nuclear weapons can destroy them. very little communica
management paradigms' for too long in the face of competition from beyond the united states. well the lessons learned -- well the lessons learned from how he it up to that general motors to the changing environment especially in the aftermath of 1920 be heated by a different generation of managers and executives. what ever be possible for any large enterprise to achieve the kind of turnaround he accomplished and then continue to grow for some years? the answers to such questions grow more complex as the change and reaction accelerates. of the legacies and adolescence brought for the world grew all the more relevant to those who would be players. with that i will be glad to take questions. i'm told that because of the sound system we have you should wait until the microphone reaches you can't stand up before asking a question. >> in the front row. >> great book, mr. pelfrey. one question i have listed in irony. i noticed in your book you say that general motors was a top seller of the vehicles in japan prior to world war ii and there's the irony. what happened there? >> that's absolutely true
york city was the vice capital of the united states. and it was an open secret it was the vice capital. it dangled more opportunities for prostitution, gambling and all-night drinking than any other city. 40,000 prostitutes worked in new york. some in brothels some on the street. there were illegal casinos, booking. this was the town teddy roosevelt was going clean it up in 1895. visitors could immediately sense the wicked possibility of the place. new york new york city had a nude weather vane. at the highest point in midtown see at the top of madison square. you can see it clearly from the ground and, you know, jay leno called the statute of liberty the hood ornament. nude diane was the hood ornament want breasts outstretched arms told new yorkers the direction of the winds. near madison square garden was the restaurant and can casino. there was a forgotten hotel there. and this housed one of the city great landmarks. it's a tame picture of it. you got a sense of an art gallery type bar. here's a better reason why thousands upon thousand of tourists came. william f a former manager c
-rosenhagen talks about the impact of friedrich nietzche on the left and the right in the united states inspect is about an hour and fifteen minutes. >> i'm so pleased to welcome my friend jennifer ratner-rosenhagen in to the new berry this evening. she is the associate professor of history at university of wisconsin madison. she earned her ph.d. of from the university of rod chester. she taught at the university of miami at the history department we were colleagues not so much years ago. friedrich nietzche was pushilied be the university of chicago press. until the book jennifer exams how they found a philosophy home in the writing. the death of god and the challenge, to universal truth have inspired american thinkers. journalists, comeeks, frols fors, poets and others have drawn on him for inspiration we learn in "american nietsche." it has reviewed widely and positively. "new york times" book editor wrote, today is not necessarily the same nietzsche in the past. the "american nietsche" it show how it is the case. stars correct to praise jennifer's ability to help the readers think more dee
case ending racial violence, like supremacy in the united states. but they don't come out and say that. fatality and story to convey that. and so michener is conveying roosevelt's interpretation of world war ii. i'm not going to talk much about the movies. you can ask me about the movies because that would take all of next year's program probably to do that, that happy to talk about. it's talk about the memorials. now, some of you have gone to see the world war ii memorial in washington, d.c. you see the arches, the patriarchs and the atlantic and pacific. 400,000 american dead but they are represented by gold stars. so you don't get the griping of you don't get the trauma, you don't get the body parts, you get the gold star. that's the traditional view of the war. it's not that it is a wrong view, but it's not the only view. it wasn't the only view among those who fought the war in the '40s and '50s. when i was a kid in school, we used to have these covers on their school textbooks and they always had rendition of the iwo jima memorial in washington. there you've got these marines fus
this in the book, which is what you call i'm having a conversation with the president of the united states. [laughter] tell us what he thinks about it now. talk a bit about that conversation. >>well, you know, when he was -- when i was actually here in new york, i had just been on "the view," and was in a memo on the way to the airport with cnn when i received a call that was 404 area code, it's atlanta so i answers that. it was congressman john lewis. when he finished talking i decided i should check my text messages. i couldn't keep my voice mail clear enough to keep getting messages. there was a message from the white house saying the president was trying to reach me. so i called the number, and they wanted to arrange the call, so it's so interesting the people in the immediate yew. the person who was in the car with me from cnn start the pull out a camcorder, i said you cannot tape me while i'm talking to the president. so i made her turn it off, and put it away. [applause] so he started out by saying you're a hard person to reach. [laughter] well, everyone knew i'd been with cnn all w
barriers is geography. rather than see the leaders of the policy leaders look at the map of the united states. the east coast and the 13 colonies is jam packed. fell whole coast of africa has endured africa's development with the east coast is packed. last resource rich part of the temper in zone. part of the enlightenment with a convenient fashion as the waterways combine. we are important that only because of our ideas and democracy. the himalayas matter. without doing much with each other through long periods of history. >> to take that image of america this suitable geographical place that was true and did not lead to the development to great civilization. to make powerful use of those hopeless to think about why it is geography with cultural aspects. >> due to the right sales to cross the atlantic voyages the development of technology italy made it more precious to open up a new geography on to the world conflict system. coulter and economics flow from geography the accumulated experience of specific people over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to traditions that could be
was a skilled worker and a shoe that are it. vanzetti had done not jobs after immigrating to the united states shortly before the arrest he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants but in the united states they became radicalized and they were anarchists. they really were anarchists. followers of an anarchist leader who advocated violence if necessary to achieve his goals. but it was there ordinariness and i think the fact that they were just you know, to ordinary guys, the nightmare that is part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think there by the grace of god. >> finally susan tejada one of the things that struck the about your look is april 15, nine t. 20 of putting context it was also the opening day of the boston red sox of the baseball season. the first year without babe ruth. do that? put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring readers into the story to make it seem real so that readers might feel they are in the courtroom. player in the prison, and so it's important to make history come alive as much as possible. >> susan te
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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